Galanthus

All plants are supplied in 9cm pots.
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Galanthus 'St Annes'
£10.00
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This is named for St Anne’s church in Sutton Bonington near Nottingham but it was actually found in north Norfolk!

Galanthus 'Sutton Courtenay'
£20.00
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Galanthus 'Tilly'
£20.00
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A pterugiform hybrid of G. gracilis and G.’Trym’ which turned up with Veronica Cross and is named for the leader of the pack. In appearance is intermediate between the parents.

Galanthus 'Tom Watkins'
£20.00
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A green-tipped hybrid, probably involving ‘Viridapice’ and a plicate, often with two flowers per bulb. Spathe normal.

Galanthus 'Trym Baby'
£20.00
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Tall, vigorous with small green tips on the slightly pterugiform outers. The result of a deliberate cross between G. p ‘Trym’ x G. n ‘Poculiformis’

Galanthus 'Tubby Merlin'
£9.00
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Galanthus 'Uncle Dick'
£20.00
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Named by Bowles for Dick Trotter, a plicate hybrid with diffuse basal mark. Chunky.

Galanthus 'Wake up Call'
£20.00
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A new double elwesii hybrid with nicely-shaped flowers. Early. Variable numbers of inners.

Galanthus elwesii 'Cross Eyes'
£15.00
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A vigorous, narrow leaved form with fuzzy eyespots and slightly green tipped.

Galanthus elwesii 'Fred's Giant'
£10.00
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This is a very large distinctly tall elwesii form with a mostly green inner. This historic cultivar is not offered very often. It was named for Fred Buglass and distributed by Primrose Warburg.

Galanthus elwesii 'Jessica'
£15.00
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This elegant, upright, green-tipped snowdrop is very vigorous and increases well. The inner markings are very variable and the green tips vary from year to year. It was found by Phil Cornish in 1997 and named for his wife. In my opinion, a complex hybrid.

Galanthus elwesii 'Kencot Ivy'
£40.00
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Galanthus elwesii

The classic species has two green marks on the inner petals but single-marked seedlings are common. The single-marked ones are known as var. monostictus and are often much earlier flowering in October to January, They can be very vigorous. The leaves are broad, distinctly grey-green and have a hooded/cupped tip. There are usually two per bulb, but three and four leaved varieties are known. Some varieties are good clumpers. Bulbs tend to be larger than G. nivalis. They grow well in drier, sunnier sites and when suited, especially on limey soils, can seed freely and naturalise well. Originally from all of Southern Turkey, often growing on sunny open slopes as well as part-shade under trees.

Galanthus elwesii 'Kencot Kali'
£40.00
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The longest- petalled, green-tipped variety ever found. Vigorous, early. Needs to settle to get to full size and markings.

Galanthus elwesii 'Kyre Park'
£10.00
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Globular flowers with the inner almost entirely green. Nicely scented. Very early flowering from late December to January. Vigorous, clumping snowdrop with relatively short glaucous leaves. Found by Martin Rickard in the grounds of Kyre Park, Worcestershire.

Galanthus elwesii 'Magnus'
£25.00
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Very distinctive with a perfectly circular basal mark. Vigorous. Mid to late.

Galanthus elwesii 'Maidwell L'
£10.00
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The inner segments have a very well defined mark in the shape of a bold X the leaves are a strong blue/grey colour. This is from a series of clones selected at Maidwell Hall, Northamptonshire. Some were renamed i.e. G. ‘Kite’ (Maidwell A) and some kept their original name hence ‘Maidwell L’. It was selected by Oliver Wyatt.

Galanthus elwesii 'Mr Blobby'
£35.00
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It is outstanding in its shape and form and can have three sets of petals (as pictured) or four sets. The flowers are very large and the ovary is very rounded, as are the petals. This was selected from a population of Galanthus elwesii, naturalised in a Cambridge garden.

Galanthus elwesii 'Peter Gatehouse'
£12.00
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This is a relatively small plant with blue grey leaves. The flower stands well above the leaves on upright stems and the apical mark is not like a typical elwesii. It is suffused green from the apical mark towards the base. The flowering period is November to December. It was found by Peter Gatehouse and given to Washfield Nursery in 1994.

Galanthus elwesii 'Sibbertoft Magnet''
£15.00
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Galanthus elwesii

The classic species has two green marks on the inner petals but single-marked seedlings are common. The single-marked ones are known as var. monostictus and are often much earlier flowering in October to January, They can be very vigorous. The leaves are broad, distinctly grey-green and have a hooded/cupped tip. There are usually two per bulb, but three and four leaved varieties are known. Some varieties are good clumpers. Bulbs tend to be larger than G. nivalis. They grow well in drier, sunnier sites and when suited, especially on limey soils, can seed freely and naturalise well. Originally from all of Southern Turkey, often growing on sunny open slopes as well as part-shade under trees.

Galanthus elwesii 'Zwanenburg'
£10.00
+

This is an early flowering snowdrop. It is incredibly vigorous snowdrop that forms good clumps. It often produces two flower stems per bulb. The flower itself is relatively large. It has a fantastic scent that really stands out. It originated from the Zwanenburg nursery in Holland.

Galanthus ikariae 'Chandler's Green Tip'
£60.00
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This variety has good green tips to the outers. A short plant with relatively large flowers. The deep-green mark is flat-topped. Deep green, broad, partly-reflexed leaves. Very slow to increase and rarely offered. Very good in deep shade. Found by Cliff and Joan Curtis.

Galanthus Mrs Thompson'
£10.00
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This sought after snowdrop is unique in that it can have one normal flower or a flower as shown, or two flowers on the stem. It’s a large vigorous snowdrop of considerable antiquity. It was first recorded in 1950.

Galanthus nivalis 'Angelfly'
£20.00
+

Very distinctive with a perfectly circular basal mark. Vigorous. Mid to late.

Galanthus nivalis 'Angelique'
£15.00
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The flowers have a very elegant long narrow look to them, almost becoming poculiform but the inners do still have green tips but with the mark divided. It is a very upright and vigorous plant with narrow leaves. To 30 cm. Seeds reasonably true. Discovered in an old garden in Normandy and named for the late daughter of Madame le Bellegard.

Galanthus nivalis 'Bagpuize Virginia'
£12.00
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A double from Kingston Bagpuize. Neat and slightly spiky.

Galanthus nivalis 'Blonde Inge'
£10.00
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Galanthus nivalis

The flowers have one green mark on the inner. Narrow grey-green leaves. Make large clumps which repay frequent division by increasing well. The most common form in the UK never, or very rarely, produces seedlings and reproduces in nature by bulbs spreading around in the summer from the bigger clumps. There are many cultivated forms and varieties which can be: double, green-tipped, all green, yellow, all white, poculiform and vary in other interesting ways. January and February. 10 to 30cm. Damper part shade under deciduous trees and shrubs and often naturalised in river valleys or in higher rainfall areas of the UK. Originally from a huge area of Western Europe, north to Germany, east to Poland and Hungary, south to Greece and Italy and west to France. Not thought to be native to the United Kingdom

Galanthus nivalis 'Charlotte Jean'
£30.00
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The only pure white scharlockii poculiform. Not easy.

Galanthus nivalis 'Chrome Yellow'
£20.00
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Brilliant yellow, with hints of orange, ovary and mark.

Galanthus nivalis 'Creme Anglaise'
£30.00
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Distinctly cream in bud and aging to creamy-white. Poculiform. Late.

Galanthus nivalis 'Danube Star'
£20.00
+

Galanthus nivalis

The flowers have one green mark on the inner. Narrow grey-green leaves. Make large clumps which repay frequent division by increasing well. The most common form in the UK never, or very rarely, produces seedlings and reproduces in nature by bulbs spreading around in the summer from the bigger clumps. There are many cultivated forms and varieties which can be: double, green-tipped, all green, yellow, all white, poculiform and vary in other interesting ways. January and February. 10 to 30cm. Damper part shade under deciduous trees and shrubs and often naturalised in river valleys or in higher rainfall areas of the UK. Originally from a huge area of Western Europe, north to Germany, east to Poland and Hungary, south to Greece and Italy and west to France. Not thought to be native to the United Kingdom

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